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Archive for the ‘Research’ Category

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Senate Committee is Considering Defense Spending Bill!

Ask Your Senators Today to Support DoD Parkinson’s Research!
This morning, the U.S. Senate Appropriations Defense Subcommittee marked up the Defense spending bill.  The full Appropriations Committee plans to take up the Defense spending bill Wednesday.  The bill sets the funding levels for all Defense programs, including the Parkinson’s disease research program, Neurotoxin Exposure Treatment Research Program (NETRP).  With your help, we hope to make this year an historic one by securing NETRP Parkinson’s disease research funding in the Senate Defense Appropriations bill for the first time.  As you may know, PAN advocates and our congressional champions have successfully secured NETRP funding each year for ten years through the U.S. House of Representatives version of the Defense bill, but NETRP has never been funded in the Senate bill.  Please take a few minutes to e-mail your senators now to ask they support this essential Parkinson’s disease research! Although the Senate has yet to fund Parkinson’s disease research directly in the Senate Defense bill, they have agreed with their congressional colleagues in conference committee each year that this important research must be funded.  In fact, sixteen senators have already expressed their support for NETRP in April of this year.  Let’s encourage our senators to stand up for Parkinson’s disease research from day one by including Parkinson’s funding directly in the Senate Defense bill!

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The following story was found at http://www.spiritindia.com/health-care-news-articles-1590.html

Regular use of the pain-relieving nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil) may delay or prevent the onset of Parkinson’s disease, according to data from roughly 147,000 U.S. men and women enrolled in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutritional Cohort.

In 1992, subjects provided information on four types of commonly used analgesics. In 2001, they provided information on the occurrence of Parkinson’s disease. The researchers detected 413 cases of Parkinson’s disease during follow up.

“We found that individuals who regularly used ibuprofen had about a 35 percent lower risk of developing Parkinson’s disease than non-users,” Dr. Alberto Ascherio, of Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, Massachusetts, told.

Specifically, compared to those who did not use NSAIDs, users of 2 to 7 ibuprofen tablets per week had about a 28 percent reduced relative risk of developing Parkinson’s disease, while those who reported using 1 or more tablets per day had a 38 percent reduced risk of Parkinson’s.

No associations were observed between the risk of PD and the use of aspirin, other NSAIDs, or acetaminophen.

“These findings suggest that ibuprofen could contribute to the prevention of Parkinson’s disease,” Ascherio said. “Because of the progressive nature of the degenerative process, it is also possible that this drug could be beneficial for individuals with Parkinson’s, but this should be tested in randomized clinical trials.”

“It would be premature for people with Parkinson’s disease to start taking ibuprofen or other anti-inflammatory drugs,” Ascherio cautioned. “Albeit promising, these findings are insufficient to support a change in current therapeutical practice.”

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From The Parkinson’s Action Network                                                                                                                                    The Senate Considers Expanding Stem Cell Research in a New Way
Ask Your Senators to Support this New Plan!

Recently, the Senate added a new section to the funding bill, Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Appropriations–known in short as “Labor-HHS Appropriations”–that would provide an incremental measure to expand ethical embryonic stem cell research.The provision simply moves the date of the current federal policy on stem cell research from August 9, 2001, to June 15, 2007, while retaining the strong ethical guidelines contained in S. 5.PAN, along with the Coalition for the Advancement of Medical Research (CAMR), is supporting this measure, but it does not diminish our efforts to override the President’s veto and enact S. 5, the Stem Cell Research Enhancement Act!

Now is the time to educate your senators about this new stem cell strategy! Let them know that you support the incremental effort to allow more stem cell lines available for research, and tell them about the hope it provides you and your family for better treatments and a cure. We expect a vote on the larger appropriations bill before August but will keep you informed as we hear more about when the “Labor-HHS Appropriations” bill is headed for a vote.To read more about stem cells and PAN’s endorsement of the new stem cell strategy, click here.

Please Contact:

Sen. Mel Martinez

Sen. Bill Nelson

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Schedule a District Meeting with Your Senators NOW on NETRP!

Congress has adjourned for “August recess” from August 4, 2007, through Labor Day. Your senators are back home in your state and will be attending local events and meetings during the month of August.While your senators are home over the next few weeks, please take this opportunity to educate them about ground-breaking Parkinson’s disease research funded by the Department of Defense (DoD) — named the Neurotoxin Exposure Treatment Research Program (NETRP).  We need the help of every member of Congress to ensure that NETRP continues to be Parkinson’s focused! In spite of being the only Parkinson’s-focused federal program, not to mention the most innovative and agile one, we struggle every year to obtain needed research dollars for NETRP.  In recent years, we have also struggled to maintain NETRP’s essential focus on Parkinson’s disease.  The Senate is expected to consider the Defense spending bill upon returning to Washington in the fall.  We are trying to secure needed funding and maintain the Parkinson’s focus of the program in the Senate bill. If you have not already, please call to set up meetings with your senators in their district office during the August recess to discuss this important Parkinson’s program.  If the Member’s schedule is already full, please ask if the senator will be hosting a town hall meeting or attending any community events that you can go to.  Be sure to let them know you are calling to support Parkinson’s research at the Department of Defense.  Thanks to those of you who have already scheduled meetings. Please print the “Dear Colleague” to give the senator or staff member during your visit.  Click here for more information on NETRP.  Please take note that this alert applies only to conversations with your senators.  Look for further action alerts about this program in the House of Representatives.  Thank you for all you do, and please let us know how your meetings go!

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Here is a downloadable copy of the National Parkinson Foundation’s Summer 2007 Parkinson Report.

Summer 2007

Just click the link and begin downloading the report. The report is in PDF format and you will need a PDF reader to view it. If you do not have a PDF reader, follow this LINK to download Adobe’s Acrobat PDF reader.

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Green tea is full of antioxidants and has many different varieties with many different flavors! If you are a fan of Chinese food, you may be able to get a serving of green tea ice cream for a delicious dessert with antioxidant power!

The following article can be found by clicking here.

 


The antioxidants in produce, green tea and garlic seem to bind naturally with iron and copper in the body to prevent damage to DNA, a U.S. study said. Cancer, cardiovascular diseases, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases are often linked to DNA damage that occurs when metal ions in the body such as iron and copper produce reactive oxygen compounds that damage human cells, said lead investigator and chemist Julia Brumaghim, of Clemson University, in South Carolina.“Our studies have shown that antioxidants even at low concentrations found in these foods bind to iron and copper and prevent DNA damage,” Brumaghim said in a statement. “This goes a long way in understanding how antioxidant supplements might help treat or even prevent these debilitating illnesses.”

The Clemson team of chemists presented their research at the 234th annual American Chemical Society national meeting in Boston.

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Parkinson's disease brain cells studied

Atlanta — A U.S. study suggests the loss of two types of brain cells — not just one as previously thought — might trigger Parkinson’s disease symptoms.

The Emory University mouse model study showed a link between the loss of both norepinephrine and dopamine neurons and the delayed onset of symptoms associated with Parkinson’s. It was originally thought the loss of only dopamine neurons triggered symptoms. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter critical for coordinating movement.

Results of the study by Emory graduate student Karen Rommelfanger and Professors David Weinshenker and Gary Miller, along with Gaylen Edwards and Kimberly Freeman at the University of Georgia, are reported in the early online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and will appear in the journal’s Aug. 21 print edition.

The link for this article is right here!

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